Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

New Hi-Tech Clothing Line Makes You ‘Invisible to Drones’

January 15, 2013

In February of last year, Congress approved a bill that will allow as many as 30,000 unmanned vehicles to tour the US sky by 2020. The Federal Aviation Administration plans to open up national airspace to drones by the year 2015,but one New York artist is launching a clothing line that will keep you invisible to the robotic aircraft. RT’s Liz Wahl brings us more…

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Social Engineering 2013: Learning ‘Careerism’ As A Moral Reward System

January 11, 2013

Aaron Jackson
Waking Times
Jan 13, 2013

The concepts of consumerism and careerism are predominant in first world countries, and are increasing in countries with less “advanced” economies too, but why?

The definition of careerism or a careerist is “the characteristics associated with one who advances his career even at the expense of his pride and dignity.” Simply looking at this definition, many of us instantly assume ‘it has nothing to do with my career’.

As children we are brought up by our parents or carers, usually with a mixture of two learning methodologies, the first of which is a reward based learning system, where a child is rewarded for doing good and, importantly, doing as they are told. The second is the opposite side of the same coin, a punishment based systempunished for disobeying and for doing bad. In general, parents try to give children the best morals and ethics that they are able to comprehend for themselves.

Watch…

However, that same parent then tells the child to do as they are told at school. The child goes to school and learns a very systematic, rigid and standardised education without much flexibility, creativity,play, freedom, and importantly, without parental guidance.  Parents tend to assume that the government’s education programmes have our children’s futures and interests at heart. Usually the teachers also believe this.

When we reach age 11/12 in the USA people are moved from Elementary school to Middle School, until 14/15 when people are moved to High School. Typically in the UK children go to Secondary School from 10/11/12 until 15/16. Why change schools, and why between 10 and 12?

Some school uniforms also represent “smart” worker clothing.

Puberty, during this time of questioning, rebelling against our parents as authority figures to find our own path, we are given alternative answers by our new schools. A lot of these school changes are careerist ideologies, once we reach these ages we are taught that we need to get the grades to get a job because having a job is successful; the better the grades, the better the career and pay, right?

In the USA this is pushed even farther as children must pass tests to even get to the next grade/school year, a very early way of learning a careerist promotion based system and also something that appears to be non-optional. Those who do not follow these rules are ridiculed as they are held back, just as people in society are ridiculed for having a low-paying job or no job at all.

The poor or jobless are considered by many of the rich, the media and the government to be worthless people of society who do not deserve, because they haven’t worked enough.. Even when these people volunteer to do charitable work, they are perceived as some kind of hippie scum.

It’s important to note that government taxes and bank’s debt interest are two other ways of getting something without working for it.

All along our parents tried to teach us good morals and ethics; what is good and what is bad. Schooling takes over and teaches us that more obeying and work is good, and anything else is bad. By the time we leave school, we have learned that working is good, and money is a replacement of our parents’ reward based system.

There’s no longer a reward based system for doing good, now there is only a reward based system of working for currency by obeying. Numbers printed on paper or a computer screen. This is now where our morals are firmly based in society.

HAPPY BOXING DAY…

December 26, 2012

Of boxers and birds…

A Discussion: ‘Shamanism and Spirituality’

December 12, 2012

Konstantin Eriksen
Waking Times

Man is a spiritual creature, always searching for meaning. But for many people in the so-called “western world,” there is a feeling of disenchantment with the world as it is: Wake up, do your job, get a mortgage, buy a house, pay your taxes and eagerly await the weekend. Perhaps you’re one of these people.

Traditional religions don’t fill the gap. People become exasperated. They start drinking alcohol or using drugs. They see no meaning in their routine days of drudgery.

Watching some documentaries about shamanism over the last few months has gotten me thinking. A lot of these so-called “primitive” peoples appear happier than we “westerners” are. They have a sense of community, a sense of belonging and a sense of responsibility to those around them.

Spiritually, they don’t seek to find a “god” outside of themselves. They don’t have rigid religious doctrines that attack all non-believers.

In traditional cultures all over the world, and in places as diverse as Siberia and the Amazon jungle, shamanic mysticism is integrated into the culture. Spirituality is integrated within each individual, and every day is considered a spiritual day. Spirit is everywhere. It is not something they do once every week on a Saturday or Sunday when the kids are out of school.

Their spirituality is experiential and visceral. They live it.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in their use of psychotropic (mind-altering) plants to affect changes in themselves. These “primitives” actually have very sophisticated ways of inducing psychological changes. Using various mushrooms, green leafy plants and plant mixtures that affect the brain, and rituals that include dance and music to affect a trance on the participants, their spiritual practices are designed to help people discover and face their dark sides, their fears and their anxieties.

Researchers who have a lot of experience studying shamanism and participating in the rituals, such as Terence McKenna, have found that this attempt to communicate directly with the spirit and emotions can transform people’s lives. Through these rituals, nature, spirit and life become unified. People become more free to express themselves. Substances are essential parts of a ritual and are not used as recreational drugs or as substitutes for television, as they are in many industrialized countries. Drug addiction is unknown in these ancient and traditional societies.

As with the sufi poets, shamans compose poetry, which they later chant. Here is a poem by the Peruvian shaman Kestenbetsa, which I have translated from French:

I will open, I will open your thoughts
by opening them, I will fill you with joy
by filling you with joy, I will straighten your thoughts
straightening them, I will do it joyously
I will straighten your body
now, I will heal you
to the depths of your heart
opening your heart, I will give you an immense feeling of joy
in this way, I will return life to you
I will return life to your body
I will return life to your thoughts
I will heal your being, I will heal your body
with the powerful scent of the trees
and with the faultless scent of the universe
in thought… for you to be joyous
remember my words
so that you may remember them, I chant them to you
although I am unimportant, I have made you shine
I have made your thoughts shine
the universe harmonizes
my words have fulfilled their promise
and that, ’till infinity.

To me it’s obvious that there is a way to be spiritual without being religious and without following a strict, dogmatic code of conduct.

After all, research in biochemistry and biophysics has shown that the world is not nearly as simple as most “scientists” have thought: DNA has electromagnetic qualities. It is not merely a chemical-reaction-generator. There are snake-like bodies inside of cells that nobody understands and whose function nobody knows. Most of the “stuff” of the universe is theorized to be “dark energy,” an energy that nobody knows anything about.

Could coming back to living a more natural life actually be a way out of our modern-society-induced disenchantment?

Read more 

For Sale: Wealthy Tory Peer’s Erotic Art Collection

November 23, 2012

NEWS ARCHIVE: ‘Expressing the flesh in chic circles’

Kate McClymont
Sydney Morning Herald
May 17, 2003

The ownership of a substantial collection of erotic photos from the world of high fashion has caused a minor stir in art circles.

To be auctioned in London next Friday, the owner of the assembled works – A (Very) Private Collection: Fashion and Eroticism Photographs 1970-1990 – is keen to remain anonymous.

A report in London’s Sunday Times noted the collection was initially thought to be that of an ageing roue, with an eye for the ladies, who was now desperate for the 100,000 or so pounds the collection is expected to bring.

The paper then received a tip the seller was the prodigious collector and former Tory treasurer, Lord Alistair McAlpine, who is hardly short of a quid.

But while the peer did assemble the collection, seven years ago he kindly donated 700 photographs by the likes of Bob Carlos Clarke, David Bailey, Terence Donovan, designer Karl Lagerfeld and others to the Art Gallery of NSW. It now appears the anonymous collector who is quietly flogging the snaps is indeed our very own art gallery.

Sydney and NSW are ‘not the epicentre of the new world’

The marketing manager for Bloomsbury Book Auctions, which is handling the sale, would not reveal to Sauce the identity of the seller, except to confirm it was an institution rather than an individual.

Despite the art gallery’s director, Edmund Capon, being a friend of Lord McAlpine, the peer knew nothing of the sale until contacted by the Sunday Times.

When Sauce contacted McAlpine, who is busy with the upcoming opening of his B & B, formerly a 14th century convent in southern Italy, his lordship was more miffed by the sleazy title.

“I’m not put out, because if they [the art gallery] want to sell something I gave them, that’s their business. The fact is, I just think it was very silly to sell these things.

“While they might not seem of great importance to a curator or photographer sitting in Sydney, which isn’t the epicentre of the new world, they are considered to be an important collection.”

Edmund Capon did not return our calls although the gallery did send the Sunday Times an email saying: “Apologies, the gallery is unable to make a comment.”

The works are described by a Sunday Times critic as influential, daring and highly formalised and that the clothes depicted “signal glamour and the high-life, not sleaze”. “The pictures in this collection were shot as high art, but their effect has been to spread this kind of eroticism throughout the culture,” the article said.

“This collection is extraordinary because it captures the moment just before we chose to make eroticism banal, an environmental itch rather than a secret delight.”

Back at the B & B, Il Convento di Costantinople, near the town of Marittima in Puglia, prospective visitors will be pleased to know that while it has no erotic photos, it is crammed with other works from the host’s vast art collection, including a substantial number of Aboriginal artworks…

Read more at Sydney Morning Herald

Read more about Graham Ovendon’s paedohilic ‘art’ at The Tap Blog