Posts Tagged ‘artificial intelligence’

SKYNET IS COMING: Computers will taste, smell and hear within five years, IBM predicts

December 18, 2012

21st Century Wire say… This is one step away from SKYNET ala Terminator – as these advances in artificial intelligence will be extended to the current multi-billion dollar per year drone industry, where unmanned drones will not just be chasing phantom terrorists in the hills of Afghanistan, but more likely chasing citizens within North America, Europe and elsewhere. 

Washington Post
Hayley Tsukayama

As 2012 winds down, lots of people are looking back at the year in tech. But at IBM, researchers have released a list of trends to expect not only in 2013, but in the next five years.

On Monday, the company released its annual “5 in 5” report, which offers up predictions about what technology innovations will catch on in the next half-decade. This year, the report focuses on how computers will process information in the future, and IBM’s researchers say that nature’s gift of five senses won’t be reserved for just the living: Machines may actually be able to process things as humans do — through touch, taste, sight, sound and smell.

That, said IBM vice president of innovation Bernie Meyerson, would be a major shift in the very architecture of computing.

“If you program a computer, it’s a gruesome undertaking,” said Meyerson, noting that — at its most basic level — the way humans load information, bit by bit, into computers, hasn’t changed since the abacus.

But advances in computer technology, Meyerson said, are already allowing computers to look at an object holistically, taking in information in a moment that would have taken years to input through code.

“Say you’re standing in a museum of modern art, surrounded by paintings and sculptures,” Meyerson said. “You would spend the rest of your adult life trying to put that into words and type it in [to a computer]. Now, imagine if you could teach it by just showing it something.”

The idea, Meyerson said, is to give humans and computers a common language. And it’s not as difficult — or as futuristic — as you may think.

Smell and taste, Meyerson said, are two senses that have a clear chemical base. If computers can sense the types of molecules — ammonia, explosive residue or gasses that indicate decay — they could alert users to different markers that would flag security risks or food-borne illnesses. The same is true of taste, he said, if computers could be programmed to recognize the correct proportions of certain chemicals. Or, the machines could be used in health planning, to find healthy combinations of foods that would appeal to the palate of the dieter.

When it comes to sight, Meyerson said, researchers have improved recognition software that can identify objects based on a database of images already loaded into the system. And in the future, computers could “hear,” by using detailed sound analyses that, for example, can tie a certain pattern of notes in a baby’s cry to anguish or joy.

Finally, computers could learn to tell the difference between cashmere or concrete by reading the appropriate signals of vibration and temperature, Meyerson said. Video game makers have already used a very basic version of this: controllers vibrate when there’s impact between objects on-screen. In the next five years, researchers could take that sort of program to a microscopic level, allowing machines to have some sense of touch, Meyerson said.

While each idea has applications of its own across many industries, Meyerson said that they would have the greatest impact when combined.

“It’s not that you want to make computers smarter than humans,” he said. “But they have bandwidth to get it in… If you want to scale its memory, you can buy a box of disk drives.”

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Russia Warning of a Catastrophic December 21st 2012 ‘Event Horizon’

November 27, 2012

A startling report prepared by the Foreign Intelligence Service states that evidenced uncovered by France’s General Directorate for External Security, during their investigation into the hacking of former President Nicolas Sarkozy’s computers by the United States and Israel, is revealing that our world is about to experience a “technological singularity,” which is seen as an intellectual “event horizon,” beyond which events cannot be predicted or understood.

According to this report, the DGSE began investigating a series of attacks on the computers belonging to several close advisers to Sarkozy earlier this year, and which French intelligence officials linked to US-Israeli spy software said to have been created to target Iran’s nuclear program. Yesterday, however, the US Embassy in Paris took the unusual step of flatly denying this DGSE report that Washington was responsible.

This SVR report supports the US denial of this attack, in a most unexpected way, by stating that evidence it has uncovered points to this event being directed, not by any individual, but by a computer system acting on its own.

And not just any computer system, this report says, but a supercomputer under the control of IBM Research who uses this massive system in collaboration with the United States Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Systems of Neuromorphic Adaptive Plastic Scalable Electronics programme, and which recently announced it had reached another brain simulation milestone.

IBM and DARPA researchers took a dramatic departure from the conventional von Neumann computer architecture, last year, which links internal memory and a processor with a single data channel. This structure allows for data to be transmitted at high, but limited rates, and isn’t especially power efficient — especially for more sophisticated, scaled-up systems. Instead, they integrated memory directly within its processors, wedding hardware with software in a design that more closely resembles the brain’s cognitive structure
The brain simulation milestone announced by IBM and DARPA this past week stated that their SyNAPSE system was now capable of crafting 2.084 billion neurosynaptic cores and 100 trillion synapses. This compares against a human brain’s 86 billion neurons and estimated 100 trillion synapses…

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